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a jokesly washington event. are told. looks like a lot of comedy. >> anything wrong with that? really.ot i think the reference he was making was to andrea mitchell and alan greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. they are a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist. alan greenspan is one of our most powerful economic minds in the last decade. it is an interesting dynamic when you have this crossover between friendship and social life. the president of the motion picture association told you he would never lobby. >> he did. i think what chris dodd is theemented in this book is impermanent feudal class, which is a term that tom coburn uses. it is used to describe the impermanent of washington. a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants. frankly, life is pretty good inside the belt. >> let's watch this. >> "this town." >> mark leibovitch. >> "this town." >> d.c. is described as inflated by big-money. a humanor schumer -- ladle in the local soap celebration buffet. wow, mark. all kinds of reaction. taking down the preening egos of this town. the
of reaction. >> they are taking down the preening egos of this town. the washington post. >> i hear there is no index. we cannot find out what is going on in this work. >> this book was so widely anticipated in washington as a screaming indictment. >> washington has created a bootleg index. >> your colleague suggested the notion of the composition -- >> everyone is talking about the book. everybody thinks they are in it. >> why are people that you wrote about so happy about this book? >> beats me. what is interesting, a lot of what you are seeing there was done before we saw the book. the speculation took on a life of its own. look. it is nice to have a book the bull are talking about, and obviously what happens is people focus on who is up, who is down, what news has broken. ultimately -- i do know what people to miss the more serious point. washington is doing very, very well in a very gilded age in some ways while the rest of the country is suffering. >> any reaction you have had to the book, surprising? >> not really. look, when you write a book, a lot can go wrong. that is the
now, it just looked like a very friendly almost clubby washington event. jokes are told that looked like a lot of comedy. that's what i saw. >> anything wrong with that? >> no, not really. >> talking -- i think the reference they were making was andrea mitchell and al greenspan's wedding that had been held around then. look, they're a power couple. andrea mitchell is a great journalist and alan greenspan is one of the most powerful economic minds and forces in the last few decades. 's an interesting dynamic. had the crossover in the friendship between professional and social life and so forth. >> you write in there for instance, chris dodd, a senator then, now works for the professional picture association he wouldn't lobby. >> he did. now he's head of the most powerful lobbying organizations in washington. what it's emblem mattic of was this fuel class. it sort of described the permanence of washington, the fact that people come here -- they almost always say now a lot of elected officials go on to become lobbyists and consultants and frank is good inside the beltway. >> here's som
, if we go out there to wilkes barre now, do you think we could find george washington, thomas jefferson, james madison, george mason, john marshall and patrick henry? we ain't going to find them. now, at some theoretical level they are there. that is, human beings with the capacity for leadership are there, but the situation doesn't permit that group to rise to the surface. and so the question is, why did that situation exist in 1776? now, there is another answer to this, which is that great leadership only emerges during times of great crisis. and this makes eminent sense, the pressure that the crisis creates. and yet we can all think of examples where there's a great crisis and there's no leadership. like now. [laughter] [applause] >> or the coming of your -- world war i in europe. so what was special, you can't say there was something special in the water back there then. you can't say god looked down upon the american college and bless them. supernatural explanations are not admitted. even if you're an evangelical you're not allowed to use those in a historical conversation. i don't
. in washington. fox news. >> iraqi war veteran accused of killing a navy seal sniper has been arraigned. shot and killed chris kyle and another man at a texas gun range. suffering from dtp to the range for therapy. the 25 year old held on 3 million dollars bond. army sergeant will face the victim's families. jury selection began for report bails. bails admitted to killing 16 afghan villagers mostly women and children. boys who survived will take the stand. >> news alert oust georgia a gun man armed fired shots in an elementary school. happened in deicature outside of atlanta the suspect got in the school following someone authorized to be there. fired a shot in the air. school was put on lock down. no one was hurt they were reunited with their relieved parents. >> been a lot on your heart much see what is going on in the news and not know what is going on. good to know no one was hurt it was a waiting thing. as far as the waiting i can't complain all the kids were safe. that's all want is your child to come home safe. suspect was arrested. authorities believe he had combloesive in his trunk
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
'm chris matthews in washington. let me start tonight with this. reince priebus is on the warpath again. the rnc chairman who has made bones trying to suppress african-american votes now has a plan to suppress the free media. having waged war on the 15th amendment, the one that gave african-americans the right to vote, he is now batting down the hatches on a free press. priebus's plan, which he described last night is to take control of the republican nominating process, deciding who will be the moderators of the debates, which debates will be authorized and which networks will be allowed to sponsor them. he, reince priebus will henceforth decide who gets to moderate the debates, where they will be permitted and which networks will be given the privilege of sponsoring them. he reince priebus will decide this big push for personal control is consistent with his oversight of a major republican plan to make it harder for minorities, the elderly and young voters to cast ballots. having loaded people down with more document requirements, voter photo i.d. cards and the rest and few opportunit
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, journal@c-span.org. at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to amazon.com founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
.e.o. of the "washington post's" parent company, donald graham. >> warner: "i am the shooter," declared army major nidal hasan at the start of his trial in an attack that killed 13 at fort hood, texas. we look at today's opening arguments and early testimony. >> ifill: the pentagon eased financial pain for its employees by cutting unpaid furlough from 11 days to six. ray suarez discusses the budget cuts and terror threats with deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. >> our effort to deal with the current budget situation, we believe, has to be driven by strategy. that is, a view of the future. terrorism is one of those things that's going to be around. >> warner: and more than 1.5 million people have fled the bloody syrian civil war. we have an on-the-ground report from the world's second largest refugee camp in jordan. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental proble
. this is the "full court press" coming to you live on current tv from our studio on capitol hill in washington, d.c. good to see you this morning and good to have you with us and welcome to washington and the summer in washington where it's kind of a ghost town with the congress out of town and the president out of town. he spent the night in los angeles. he will be down at camp pendleton later this afternoon. we will bring you up to date on the news of the day and take your calls at 1-866-55-press. look forward to hearing from you on twitter at bpshow and on facebook at facebook.com/billpressshow. in the news today, of course, everybody still buzzing about the fact that "the washington post" was sold. could "the new york times" be next? that's what people are asking. and around washington, the most common reaction is well, jeff bezos bought it, at least it wasn't rupert murdoch or the koch brothers. good news on the child obesity front. give some credit to first lady michelle obama. pardon me. oh, my god, i don't think i've ever done that on television before but for the first time ever -- not e
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
their deaths. >> david, we're going to go to washington in just a moment where we will talk about what the opposing sides in washington say that syria wants but you are on the ground there. what do the syrian rebels want from the international community and are those rebels united so that the international community can get behind them? >> well, they are united enough, del, that they want to be able to say the syrian government, assad's government is responsible for the chemical attacks and what amounts to sustaining this warfare in the nation of syria. but right now on the first step they would like to take is that it be defined it was the government that used the chemical weapons because that will be a game-changer in syria and something the rebels to want see. >> us live from beirut, david, thank you very much. mean white reuters is quoting a senior white house official saying there is very little doubt that chemical weapons were used by the syrian government against the civilians there. it was only a year ago that obama warned about the use of chemical weapons saying it was a red l
anniversary of the march on washington. david martin and holly williams on the countdown to an attack on syria. scientists discover a brain protein that improves memory. dr. jon lapook has the study. a cbs news poll out tonight reveals how much america is changing on race. and memories of the march from the foot soldiers who were there. icons of civil rights on what is left to be done. >> the future is in your hands, in your heart, in your mind. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley reporting tonight from washington. ing tonight from wash >> pelley: good evening. today the president commemorated one momentous event-- the march on washington-- as he contemplated another: a possible military strike on syria. we're going to start tonight with the 50th anniversary of the march and dr. martin luther king's i have a dream speech. president obama stood as dr. king did at the lincoln memorial and addressed a crowd of thousands gathered on the national mall. he paid tribute to those who had marched a half century earlier demanding jobs and freedom. >> on the battl
canceled his meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that is all next on "washington journal." ♪ is sunday,orning, it august 11 come up 20 13. it is today, resident obama began his week long vacation at martha's vineyard. today we will be discussing the state of u.s. relations with dive intoking a deep u.s. job numbers, and talking about recent al qaeda threats. before we do that we want to hear about the state of news media from our viewers. the pew research center's -- you research center released its biannual data and while there is still plenty of criticism about the industry, most americans continue to believe the media plays an important watchdog role. as we take you through that reports this morning, we want to hear your thoughts. he of us a call. we split our lineup -- we split our lines up by age group. you can also catch up with us on all of your favorite social media sites, on twitter and facebook. you can also e-mail us at .ww.c-span.org we want to take you to that report that was released on thursday by the pew research center for the people. public valuations
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to twitter.com/c-spanwj or post your comments on facebook.com/cspan or e-mail us at journal@c-span.org. a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to c-span.org. before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
at washington. lastwas held hostage december, and i thought i was going to be added to this list. i was lucky after five unpleasant days. i got out. there was a gun battle and a rescue and i managed to escape. i was rescued and escaped. i returned to syria last week for the first time since being kidnapped, and instead of having list, iadded to this have the honor of paying respect to my colleagues who did not make it, and i would like to thank the newseum for that privilege. the question is, why do we do it? why take the risks? is it for fun, ford venture? -- for adventure? is it for the money? there are easier ways to make money than this. like the earth's plates when they snap like violent political change, and we see how the plates are fitting together. we do so the innocents have a voice. we do it because we have decided this is what we want to do with our slice of time on this planet. event back in may. all of the available in our field library at www.c-span.org. looking live at the iwo jima memorial just outside washington based on the photograph by joseph rosenthal in 1945. it was the
jefferson, lincoln, washington had fought for. the only, i think, two pieces of oratory that would rival it would be fdr's, the only thing we have to fear is fear itself and president kennedy inaugural address. martin luther king joined the founding fathers 50 years ago today. >> reverend al sharpton obviously an important event 50 years ago. 50 years laterer there will be an african-american president going to commemorate this moment. what an extraordinary journey it has been and the journey, as you say every day and as all americans understand, the journey continues. what do you want to hear from the president of the united states today? >> well, i think that what we want to hear is a commitment to continue that journey but to also salute the fact that we have made the journey. we met with him two days ago after having a huge march on saturday about the issues now. and one of the things that i said is that i feel that he should not be compared to dr. king. he is the president. we want to hear from him as the generation before us heard from kennedy about what we are going to do. so i th
troops to general washington. there is no doubt this was a massive setback for the british war effort. but the fact remains that even surrendering 7000 troops to washington, the british still and tens of thousands of more troops in north america and they could have somebody tens of thousands of more troops from other parts of the empir empiref they had decided to do so. but they were not able to do so because of the power of a new force in insurgent warfare, a term that was only going to faithfully in 1776, the power of public opinion. now, if the founding fathers had been battling the roman empire i can assure you that the romans, no matter how many battlefield defeats they would've suffered, would have come back and george washington, the founders, would have been crucified quite literally. the fact that this did not happen is because of what happened in an institution that the roamers did not have to worry about, at least not after the rise of the empire. and that was the house of commons, parliament. in 1782, a year, in the year after the battle of yorktown it was a very close vot
homeland security committee. analysis from ted koppel of nbc news and "the washington post's" barton gellman. then presidential orders. strong words from the commander in chief this week about stamping out sexual assault in the military. the pentagon is preparing new rules, but there is an agreement on how to end the crisis. i go one-on-one with one of the lawmakers pushing for change, missouri senator claire mccaskill. >>> the immigration debate. a critical time for reform as members of congress head back to their districts to prepare for the fall fight. what are the prospects for passage? talk to both sides including the congressmen leading the fight against reform. >>> end of an era. the venerable "the washington post" is sold to amazon's jeff bez bezos. was what does it say about the future of traditional media? inside analyst from "the washington post's" david ignatius and david gross of "the new york times". all of that ahead on me"meet th press" this sunday morning, august 11th. good sunday morning. president obama is on vacation, congress is out of town, and although we are i
hosted by the stemson center in washington, d.c. included analysts like stuart bolin, inspector general for iraq reconstruction and his recent report arguing that a the u.s. does not have a well executed plan to implement and oversee the reconstruction efforts. defense department and u.n. officials also participated in the discussion. this is an hour and a half. >> good morning everyone. i am ellen laipson and i'm delighted to welcome you to the stimson center for this muggy of this conversation about war and peace new tools for messy transition. we are gathering at the time that we can see the end of both the iraq and afghanistan engagement, and this event in a way is pivoted around the offer by the special inspector general for the iraqi reconstruction to present some of the findings for the final report so the special inspector general office created in 2004 is now completing its work so it is a moment of reflection and looking back at what are some of the lessons of iraq, but we know that iraq is such an out liar and may be such an exception in the kind of engagement both the united
to the u.s. and wants to work with washington and wants to work with the fbi. like the other people, we have also been told the source of the current threat goes squarely back to yemen. as for the timing, there three main reasons. is the chatter and the information about a specific threat. two, tomorrow. tomorrow is the holiest day of ramadan, the muslim holy month and al qaeda tried to use this specifically very holy day during ramadan to try and increase its inspiration. lastly, there was an attack, a drone attack in yemen mid-last month that didn't get a lot of attention in the western media. one of the top leaders of al qaeda and the arabian peninsula in yemen was killed. we have been told this plot or alert may be al qaeda and the arabian peninsula's attempt at revenge. >> thanks to both of you. more on the threat tomorrow morning on "meet the press." david gregory's guest will be chambliss and dick disturb ib in. >> unrelated to the militants with ties to pakistan, ax tack india's consilate in afghanistan. three suicide bombers armed with assault rifles and a car packed with explo
, nicolle wallace. >> she's great. >> she's amazing. msnbc contributor mike barnicle. and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the -- >> amazon -- >> newly sold "washington post," wow, big news there, in your world, gene. we'll talk about that. >> no free shipping for you, mika. >> he's like the free shipping czar now. >> my goodness. none for me. >> all right. mike barnicle, this is like a big day -- >> mike, this is huge. >> this is. >> this is -- >> i was surprised. >> as willie was saying last night at the holiday inn, the plates are shifting under the media world and then we had a couple smokes and watched old reruns of "night of a thousand". >> you ran out of cigarettes before i got there. >> one pack talking about the globe, another pack -- >> the sale of the post as i'm sure gene will have more to say on this, it was stunning. >> it's an earthquake. >> stunning. >> but no family, few families who have owned newspapers have been better at it and more honorable at it than the graham family and i choose to think donnie graham and the waymouth aspe
, all eyes on washington and the state department. that's because secretary of state john ker seset to make a remark on the situation in in syria. his comments come after u.n. investigators completed an inspection of chemical weapons attacks today in and around damascus. the u.n. saying investigators interviewing survivors and doctors and collecting samples before returning to their hotel, but not until after there was a sniper that forced them at one point in time to rey treat. we go to washington. bring us up-to-date. >> reporter: all along in the five days since that chemical attack and the horrific images out of syria to television and computer screens worldwide, the administration from the president down stress any option or retaliation exercised must be of an inter national nature. of we know that john kerry had at least two dozen phone calls with his counterparts around the region and world including the syrian foreign minister on saturday. he spoke with the 4 french and the foreign ministers from a number of gulf states. the united states doesn't want to go this alone and br
in washington, she took her sweets where she could find them. apparently she had her sons and others buy chocolate shells by the barrelful and she writes about the medicinal qualities of fudge. i mean it was as if she took it where she could find them. that's pretty pathetic. >> i would say that the shells are probably not bon-bons. she is not sitting on her sofa munching. they're the cocoa bean shell. you would steep them in hot water. it would be like coffee and you would add milk. she was interested in the medicinal qualities of it. i wouldn't go too far on john quincy's sourness. there is affection between the two of them and great love. otherwise she could have stayed in quincy. >> after they lost, i think, the daughter, is it true he gave her a book on the diseases of the mind? >> some months later, yes. >> it's the modernize, the insensitivity. he is certainly not a modern husband. louisa had by one count nine miscarriages. >> minimum five and a still birth, officially more. -- potentially more. they are sometimes hard to read into it because of how discreet they are with their la
to revisit the march on washington and the artistic way newtown, connecticut, is moving forward. >>> but first, obama versus putin. clash of the titans. >>> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. is it just me or is it feeling a little cold war in here? >> i think we saw more rhetoric on the russian side that was anti-american that played into some of the old stereotypes about the cold war contest between the united states and russia and i've encouraged mr. putin to think forward as opposed to backwards on those issues, with mixed success. >> that was president obama yesterday during a press conference at the white house, capping off a week where the news has been all about u.s./russian relations. on wednesday, the president announced that he would skip a planned one-on-one meeting with russian president vladimir putin. that was scheduled for next month. but the white house said that there has not been enough progress on major issues like nuclear arms and human rights to make a presidential meeting worthwhile. they also cited russia's decision to give asylum to u.s. leaker, edw
affairs events from washington directly to you, putting you in the room at congressional hearings on the white house events, briefings, and conferences and offering complete coverage of the u.s. house, all as a public service of private industry. industryy the cable tv 34 years ago and funded by your local cable or satellite providers. you can watch us in hd. >> a look at the defense department's budget cuts under sequestration and the impact of those cuts on military readiness and strategy. the pentagon will have to cut $500 billion over the next decade. the discussion was hosted by the brookings institution. >> good morning. called dissecting the pentagon strategic choices and management review. i am marvin calvin. i am a senior advisor to the center for crisis reporting which is located just next door. way back in august 2011 which is only two years ago congress passed and the president signed into law a legislative monstrosity called the budget control act. it was a way of doing something when nothing seemed worse. at least at that time. a joint committee was set up to control
in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwilling to militarily intervene in syria, despite the deaths of more than 100,000 people and a vow he made more than one year ago. >> that's a red line for us. and that there would be enormous consequences if we start seeing movement on the chemical weapons front. >> with that line possibly crossed, senator john mccain
, his guilty" issumed premiering on msnbc will stop on the next washington journal, the rise of the conversation on drones and privacy issues. 745, -- and seven: 45, would talk about domestic drones -- at 7:45, we talk about the usage of domestic drones. , a privacy and west. washington journal begins live at 7:00 a.m. eastern time every day on c-span. wednesday, the center for american progress hosts a former -- a forum for preventing and ending human trafficking. obama's half-sister will be a speaker at the event. remember the march ending and dr. king delivering that speech will stop president kennedy invited us back to the white house and he stood in the door of the oval office to meet each one of us. he was like a beaming and proud father. he was glad that everything had gone so well. .e said, you did a good job he said to dr. king, you had a dream. >> tomorrow, we will look back with a panel conversation with john lewis and your chance to call in and comment. starting at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. ladieson two of first begins monday, september 9 with a look at the life of
at the national press club in washington, d.c. he addressed a voter id laws and the feature of the republican party. this is about one hour. >> our speaker today is benjamin jealous,who at 35 became the youngest president and ceo of the national association for the advancement of colored people. a mixed race kid from california, jealous grew up in a family always challenged by the issue of race. according to an interview in "essence" magazine, his grandparents faced obstacles dating back to slavery. his mother helped desegregate her high school in baltimore, and joined sit-ins at lunch counters in virginia. his father told him what it was like to be the lone white guy at a lunch counter sit-in and getting worked over by the police, who saw him as a race traitor. as a kid, mr. jealous recalls being at a discount store with a black friend, and noticing a white lady peeking at them through the pegboard to make sure they were not stealing anything. he has led advocacy, but he could, at one time, qualify for mentorship at the national press club. reliable reports say he once tried his hand at inve
, "daily beast" editor and "washington post" columnist and msnbc contributor jonathan capehart, and senior editor for "the atlantic," and former fellow on the press. and diplomatic correspondent for the "washington post," ann guerin. and joining us from cairo, nbc news foreign correspondent amman mojadin. when we look at the rising crescendo of a potential strike as early as thursday, as i mentioned, are we understand to understand that most of the diplomatic solutions are off the table from the u.s. perspective? >> yes. i mean as far as a diplomatic solution that would avert a military one. as a component of any military strike the united states were to initiate, it is trying very hard to get diplomatic backing which is a different thing. so you've seen some of that happening over the last couple of days, and you saw an important element in that recipe coming today with the arab league saying that chemical weapons were used and appearing to back some open international response. stopped short of saying that bombing military sites in syria was acceptable. but it's exactly the kind of regio
. the march on washington teaches us that we are not trapped by the mistakes of history. we are masters of our fate. it also teaches us that the promise of this nation will only be kept when we work together. we will have to reignite the embers of empathy and fellow feeling, the coalition of conscience that found expression in this place 50 years ago. i believe that spirit is there. that force inside each of us. i see it when a mother recognizes her own daughter in the face of a poor black child. i see it when the black youth think of his own grandfather in the dignified steps of an elderly white man. it is there when the nativeborn recognizes that striving spirit, when interracial couple connects the pain of a gay couple and experiences it as their own. that is were courage comes from. when we turn not from each other, or on each other, but towards one another and we find that we do not walk alone. that is were courage comes from. -- where courage comes from. [cheers and applause] with that courage, we can stand together for good jobs and just wages. we can stand together for the right to hea
feinstein, but if i recall in the washington post article, she commented to the washington post that she was not aware of the compliance audits until the washington post asked her about them. my question to you is, are you informed about what she saw? was she telling the washington post something different? >> if you have questions about her comments, it you should check with her. i read to you her on the record statement about this issue. what she may have been referring to in that report -- >> what did the senator mean when she was quoted? >> i do not have the store in front of me. i know that some members of congress have suggested that they did not see these nsa reports that were reported on by the washington post. but what they did see and what many of them were briefed on were the regular reports that are due to congress from the nsa as part of their oversight function. reports on a regular basis are made to members of congress and intelligence committees about some of these issues and some of the broader issues that allow congress to fulfill their responsibility to conduct oversig
much the same. this is from "the washington post," this morning. host: another right up this morning in "usa today." taking a look to some of the analysis perceptions on the, shutting down some many diplomatic facilities over a large geographical area "means that officials -- host: for our first half hour this morning we will take your thoughts on security issues in light of this recent announcement, the closing of diplomatic missions, we want to get your thoughts on it as well. again, if you want to give us a call, it is for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can make your thoughts known to us on twitter this morning and on our facebook page. 25 people posted before the start of the show, some of the thoughts are -- host: some of the ways you can make your thoughts known this morning, the numbers are there on your screen. ed, starting off this morning of the democratic line from cincinnati, ohio. caller: i have a comment now about the previous program with wendy davis. texas clinics. you guys encapsulate it as the legislation
to be more relaxing than entertaining in washington. she was less worried serving 100 people here than 20 in washington. many important figures would be seated with them. thomas jefferson was frequently here. james monroe was here. henry clay. margaret smith. once while mrs. madison was serving at the head of the table the vice president offered to do the honors for her and she responded oh no, watch with what ease i do it. and he had to admit she did it with unparalleled ease. it was as if she were born and educated worsen inverse i. versailles. >> and looking at their life when they returned there, how was it compared to when they lived in the white house? >> i think they were besieged by people who wanted to associate themselves with the mad sons. many visitors in addition to -- political visitors in addition to family and friend. sort of like the washingtons and the jeffersons. everybody wanted to meet the great personages. so they had people in the house with them. not only relatives but many political visitors as well. >> she was devoted to him and getting his papers together in tha
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